Giant Flashing Disclaimer

Below you will find pictures of products that BBR Motorsports has made in the past.  Many have been discontinued.  If we had any left overs or scratch-n-dents of these items we would have them for sale on our website on our Product pages.

You may have found this page from a search engine.  Please understand that many of these parts are no longer available.  Everything that BBR Motorsports currently manufactures and sells is listed on our Products page.  These images are shown here for historical reasons and to assist current owners of these products.  Many of these "legacy" products can still be found on the used market by watching eBay, Planet Minis, or Craig's List (use one of the aggregates like www.allofcraigslist.com to see all listings in the US).

The simple truth is that we discontinue products when they are no longer profitable to manufacture.  AGAIN:  Many of the following pictures show items that we no longer make, sell, or have available.  Keep that in mind as you look through this page.

Keweseki Motorcycle
And you thought we were making that up...

By far, the vast majority of tech questions we get are for products we didn't make and have no experience with.  We really have no way of knowing if our bore kit will work with your Keweseki motorcycle.  The first rule of motorcycles is that there are no standards.  So, don't expect our jetting specs to work with whatever knock-off carb you bought on-the-cheap.  You can't (easily) interchange parts between brands and often not even between different models of the same brand bike (or different years).  The exceptions are tires, chains, grips, etc.  Even grips are tough when talking about the 50cc bikes which generally use 3/4" handlebars where most all other motorcycles (and bicycles) use 7/8" bars.  That's why we built our Handlebar Kits to begin with.  Everything needs to change to get to normal 7/8" handlebars.

This lack of interchangeability with motorcycle parts is difficult for some customers to understand. If you grew up racing BMX in the '70's or '80's you may expect simple things like throttle cables to be universal. They are not. Unfortunately, in the motorcycle world almost nothing is "universal".


WD-40® Lip Balm
That gives me an idea for a great new product for gear heads, though...

Most true BBR products have the "BBR" logo engraved, cast, laser etched, or decal-ed directly on the part.  So, while some people may feel like "BBR" has become the generic name for play-bike parts (like BAND-AID®, Kleenex®, WD-40®, or ChapStick®), we really can't help you with something we didn't make.  Just because the classified ad or auction listing had "BBR" somewhere in it, don't expect us to know everything about your bike.  In general, we build bolt-on performance parts for Japanese motorcycles.  Don't be mad at us when we don't make parts to fit your Chinese knock-off bike.  Even if the guy at the auto-parts/sporting goods/hardware store told you it takes the same parts as some Japanese bike - it almost certainly does not.  We've also put together a little Brand Identification web page to help you find info on non-BBR products commonly found on pitbikes and playbikes.

Crazy Chinese Carb
Petrol Aeration Device

Customers often expect us to be experts on bikes and parts that we've never seen or owned.  While we like to be helpful, keep in mind, that if you purchased some no-name part from an auction site, just to save a few bucks, we have no real incentive to help you.  We're one of the few play-bike guys (left) that answer our phones.  We get it.  You need help.  But, if the company that made your part ("made" is a pretty generous term for a guy in his garage buying parts off of a Chinese website. "Company" is pretty generous too...) can't help you with jetting, don't expect us to.  That carb, that you got the awesome deal on, may not be such a great deal if you can't figure out jetting that works with your bike.

We put together this little "How to" to help you figure out what you have.  Choose from the categories below and we'll try to help you figure it out.

BBR has really only sold 1 complete bike that had standard components (our MM12P Production Bike).  Everything else was a custom build for the customer (where they got to choose each and every part) or it was assembled from one of our frame kits (by the purchaser or a third party).  Whomever assembled your bike (us included) could have used whatever components they wanted.  Even if we built the bike, many times the owner (or subsequent owner) has made changes we don't know about.   That means that you can't simply call us for a head gasket for your "BBR" bike.  It will take some more investigation to figure out what you have.

The vast majority of BBR Framed bikes left our shop as a frame kit.  Maybe 1 in 100 of our frames were assembled, as complete bikes, here at BBR.  That means that an end user or a shop assembled the bike and we have no idea what parts they used.   There are literally thousands of options for engines that fit Honda 50 motor mounts.  Honda alone has a pretty big number (QA50, CT70, Z50, XR50, XR70, CRF50, CRF70, etc).  Add in all the Japanese aftermarket and Chinese knock-off stuff and it gets pretty crazy.  That is just the Honda 50 frames.  Consider, also, that we've made just as many frames for the Kawasaki KLX110 based motors.  Plus frames for the XR100 (CRF100), TTR125, CRF150F, CRF230F, CRF150R, XR200, etc. At the peak of the pit-bike craze, there were over 500 different companies supplying various performance parts - most of which won't directly interchange with our stuff.

Note also: You can search your local classifieds or the on-line auction sites, pretty much at any time, and find someone selling what they call a "BBR" bike.  What you really find can be anywhere from a Chinese knock-off bike, with BBR graphics or decals, to a real BBR race team bike.  Most often it is simply a Japanese play-bike with several BBR products installed.   Keep in mind that we have sold many more graphics kits than we have sold complete motorcycles (or frame kits).  Also, motorcycle guys are not particularly brand loyal. The majority of bikes that claim to be "All BBR" probably have a bunch of add-on parts from a bunch of different companies.  Please understand that we aren't making a judgment about you, your bike, or your gullibility when we have to tell you that we can't help you with replacement parts for a competitor's product.  If we didn't design it, make it, sell it, or install it - how can we help you with anything but (possibly) the name of who to contact?

Complete Bikes & Frame Kits


Early bikes

We built our first complete motorcycles around 1995 (not counting dozens of shop-class, backyard frankenstein bikes).  These were hand-made, one-off, creations.  Even if we built more than one, they were intended as "magazine bikes" or to test out a new idea.  Nothing was CNC machined, there are no "blueprints", and replacement parts do not exist.  Often we can't even tell you what we did without seeing some pictures of the original bike and any items in question.  We really didn't build any of these with the intention of selling them.  When people saw pictures in the magazine they contacted us to buy the bike.

Most of these type of bikes were a combination of a four-stroke play-bike motor into an custom aluminum frame using the chassis components from the race 2-stroke of that era.  If the bike had a title at all, we considered it a modification of the bike the four-stroke motor came from and we used that title.  Most of these early bikes used motors from the XR400, XR250, or the XR100.  Performance engine parts came from Al Baker's XR's Only, White Bros, Powroll, Webcam, Megacycle, or were home grown.  The best documentation on these motorcycles is probably found in the original magazine article (most of which can still be found in our News section).  There are maybe only a couple of dozen of these types of bikes still known to exist.  We know of several on permanent display in motorcycle shops, museums, and private collections.

If you call or e-mail us about trying to find one of these bikes ("Don't you have a scratch-n-dent laying around?", or 'Why don't you keep a list of used ones?", etc), don't be surprised when we give you the standard "watch eBay, Planet Minis, and Craig's List" response.

Conversion bikes

During this same time period we also modified a number of steel frame CR80's to accept the XR100 motor.  Of course it also required a different exhaust and air box/carb modifications.  Regardless of what you read on the Internet, there isn't a "motor mount kit".  It required cutting the cradle and downtube off the OEM Honda steel frame and fabricating completely new ones (while secured in a fixture to prevent the frame from distorting).  Then motor mounts and something to grab the rear motor mount near the swingarm.  Then some kind of exhaust, intake manifold, and airbox.  Lots of guys were doing these back then and it isn't alway easy to tell if it is one of ours or someone else's work.  Early ones are square tube cradles and later ones are round tube.  Almost every one was unique.  We called these "conversion" bikes.

Our first production frame kit was our vision of the "conversion in-a-box".  We didn't like the compromises made trying to shoe-horn the XR100 motor into the steel frame of the CR80.  So we built a whole new frame - and we made it an aluminum perimeter.  The first few of these were 100% hand made (no CNC).  Later we were able to CNC the side spars and the head tube.  Everything else was hand bent tubes and band-sawed parts.  We soon built a version to use the Yamaha TTR125 motor and the XR200.  Later we made a version for the Honda CRF150F and CRF230F motors.  We even stuffed a few YZ250F and CRF250R motors into this basic chassis.

Note that each frame kit was purpose built for whatever motor it was designed to fit. It is more than just different motor mounts. The down tube, cradle, and welded mounts are unique to each frame. Basically, you can't buy a frame kit with an XR100 motor in it and change to a TTR125 motor. It would require completely cutting apart the frame and fabricating a new cradle, downtube, mounts, etc. We're the guys that designed and built these things and we won't do it. It is too difficult and expensive even for us. Find the correct frame for the motor you want to use. Oh, and don't let the welder down the road tell you it is easy and he can do it. Simply ask him what ASTM heat treat spec he intends to use after he ruins your frame by welding on it. When he gives you a blank stare - run.

For early versions, the customer was expected to take the title from their motor donor bike, the CR80 donor bike title, and the receipt for the frame kit to their local DMV to have them generate a "custom bike" title - much like the Harley guys did.  In late 2002, we were able to secure a manufacturer's ID to begin sending an MSO (Manufacturers Statement of Origin) with the frame kits.  A title could be generated directly from this document at any state DMV. See our VIN FAQ for more info.

XR50 (CRF50)

Conventional Backbone frame

When Honda updated the Z50 to become the XR50 (CRF50) in 2000, we jumped on it.  We were already riding and modding the Z50's for our kids, but now the 50 looked a lot more like Dad's bike! We were riding an aluminum framed version (mimicking the OEM steel frame and swingarm) within about 2 weeks of the bike hitting the dealer showroom floor.  These early frames were backbone style and used all the OEM components.  Most were anodized gold (in a nod to our heroes at DG).  A small number were anodized red, silver, and black.

Super Pro

Even when we were working on the horizontal shock frame, we were testing a vertical shock design.  The toughest part was getting a reasonably priced shock that could handle an adult.  If the shock had come through in time the horizontal shock version may never have existed.  The first versions of the vertical shock frame used a Paoli shock from the US Polini importer.  A huge amount of testing went into the shock position and the resulting leverage ratio of shock.  The basic shock angle and position of all of our linkage-less rear suspension came from this testing.

The Paoli shock was a decent shock but we quickly used up the lower priced inventory of spare shocks that Polini had.  We then turned to our friends at Elka to make us a purpose-built shock for adult play-bikes.  They probably regretted ever getting involved with BBR! We love testing and we must have sent the test shock back and forth to Canada a couple of dozen times.  In the end, we created the suspension that every other play-bike has been tested against.  Many of our competitors simply copied this design and had no idea how much work we put into it.

Anyway, this vertical shock, backbone XR50 (CRF50) frame, came to be known as the "Super Pro".  There are several versions of these out in the wild. Eventually, all the major components were CNC machined.  We settled on a shot blasted silver anodized finish.  The majority of the Super Pro frame kits were 1" longer than stock (from the head-tube to the swingarm pivot).  Some of the later versions were indeed 2" longer. Final versions also shipped with a non-adjustable Super Comp billet swingarm (5" longer than stock).

Perimeter

When we were working on the first vertical shock frame kits, for the XR50 (CRF50), Duane was pretty much disgusted with it.  We knew that perimeter frames (on anything) work better - and he didn't really want to do a back-bone frame.  So, he was secretly working on the perimeter version at home.  When we shipped the first production Super Pro frame kits, he was already riding the prototype perimeter version.  Due to it's complexity, it took us almost 2 years to go from prototype to production on the perimeter frame.  The main thing we learned during testing was that the OEM Honda engine cases couldn't support that weight of the motor and the rider through the OEM style footpeg mount.  For the first time, the rider could go big bike speeds and jump stuff that no other play bike had ever been able to before. That extra stress meant that the motor was getting ripped out of the frame.  We added the lower motor-mount platform and moved the footpegs onto the frame spars.

The single most common request we get is probably for swingarms that we no longer produce. Customers always believe that if we just make them again, we'll sell hundreds. Unfortunately, we've found out that isn't the case. Every 5 or 8 years we'll do a run and put them on our website or eBay. We sell 3 immediately, and sit on the rest for the next year or two (or more). For your viewing pleasure here are some of the bikes we've done swingarms for. But, please don't call asking us to do them again...

Honda CRF100 (XR100) swingarms


The first retail product BBR ever made was a swingarm for the Honda XR100.  We've sold a lot of them in various configurations, through the years, but the most common added 1 inch in length and raised seat height 1".  The last production run of BBR CRF100 (XR100) swingarms left here in 2006. We do not have any more here, so you'll have to look on the used market if you need one.

These swingarms used the OEM Honda chain slider. We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with the OEM Honda inner bearing races.

Yamaha TTR125 swingarms


We've sold a lot of them in various configurations, through the years, but the most common added 1 inch in length and raised seat height 1".  The last production run of TTR125 swingarms left here in 2006. We do not have any more here, so you'll have to look on the used market if you need one.

These swingarms used the OEM Yamaha chain slider. We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with the OEM Yamaha inner bearing races.

Honda CRF50 (XR50) swingarms


The early swingarms (with the 1" box side tubing) used the OEM Honda CRF50 (XR50) chain slider. We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with a solid stainless steel bushing. The bushing can often be saved with a ScotchBrite pad, but BBR can supply replacements if you tell us the measurements of the original or send it to us to measure. These early swingarms used the OEM Honda CRF50 (XR50) chain adjusters.

Later Super Stock swingarms all use a custom BBR chain slider. Replacements are available from the current product page of the CRF50 Super Stock swingarms.

Honda CRF70 (XR70) swingarms


BBR made a very small number of the early style gold swingarms for the Honda CRF70 (XR70). They were similar to the CRF50 (XR50) swingarms with dimensions adjusted to fit the CRF70 (XR70) frame and rear wheel. We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with a solid stainless steel bushing. The bushing can often be saved with a ScotchBrite pad, but BBR can supply replacements if you tell us the measurements of the original or send it to us to measure. These early swingarms used the OEM Honda CRF50 (XR50) chain adjusters (which are the same as the CRF70 (XR70). These used the OEM Honda CRF70 (XR70) chain slider.

Suzuki DRZ70 swingarms


BBR made a very small number of Super Stock swingarms for the Suzuki DRZ70. They sold poorly and are a rare find today.

We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with a solid stainless steel bushing. The bushing can often be saved with a ScotchBrite pad, but BBR can supply replacements if you tell us the measurements of the original or send it to us to measure. The chain slider is our standard Super Stock swingarm chain slider.

Kawasaki KLX110 swingarms


Super Stock

BBR has built several swingarms from the KLX110. Our current swingarm is the Super Stock swingarm that is a horizontal "Monoshock" type swingarm that mimics the OEM swingarm style. The Super Stock swingarm is 2.5" longer than stock and is lighter and stronger than the OEM version. More details can be seen on the KLX110 Super Stock Swingarm product page.

SuperPro Swingarm Kits

Over the years, we've also built several swingarm "kits" to update the old-school monoshock type suspension of the KLX110 to a vertical shock arrangement similar to modern MX bikes. The first of these kits used a welded box "Super Pro" swingarm similar to the swingarm used on our Perimeter Frame kit. A machined aluminum upper shock mount allowed the shock to sit vertically.

SuperComp Swingarm Kits

Later versions of these kits used the "SuperComp" swingarm which featured carved billet aluminum sides with the BBR logo machined in.

The final run of these swingarm kits had a new top shock mount that allowed the swingarm kit to be used with 2010 and newer electric start KLX110. Only about 50 of these were ever made.

These vertical shock swingarm kits are no longer available. They were discontinued simply because they were not profitable. We no longer have any available (new or used) and cannot make one-offs. If you want one of these kits you'll have to search the used market to find one.

Yamaha TTR50 swingarms


BBR made a very small number of Super Stock swingarms for the Yamaha TTR50. Probably less than 25. They sold poorly and are a rare find today.

We used (fairly standard) HK1816 needle bearings with a solid stainless steel bushing. The bushing can often be saved with a ScotchBrite pad, but BBR can supply replacements if you tell us the measurements of the original or send it to us to measure. The chain slider is our standard Super Stock swingarm chain slider.